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Definitions

Hunger is a complex problem that requires multiple solutions. Read on to better understand some of the more common anti-hunger terms used to reframe the issue.

Low Food Security

According to the USDA, households with low food security make up about two-thirds of food-insecure households. These households manage to get enough to eat, but reduce the quality, variety, or desirability of their meals to do so. Members of these households are at elevated risk for a number of problematic health and developmental conditions, but because they do not substantially reduce the amount of food they eat, they are not likely to suffer from hunger in the sense of the uneasy or painful sensation caused by lack of food.

Filed under: Get the Facts, Community Solutions, Poverty, Get Help

Very Low Food Security

According to the USDA, households with very low food security - the more severe condition - make up about one-third of food-insecure households. In these households, at least some members reduce the amount of food they eat below usual levels and below the amount they consider appropriate. In most of these households, the adult respondent reports that in the past 12 months he or she was hungry and did not eat because there wasn't enough money for food. If these conditions extend to children, the household is classified as having very low food security among children, the most severe range of food insecurity.

Filed under: Get the Facts, Community Solutions, Poverty, Get Help